INTENSE BACK TO BACK STORMS FOR EUROPE THIS WEEK

Monday, 09 January 2017 |

Intense storm in the northern Atlantic moves into the Norwegian Sea today and weakens as XL sized NW swell from the storm impacts mainland Europe. The British Isles will start to see some relief from the pummeling the storm has delivered as near-gale onshore winds relax through the day. Unfortunately, conditions are not looking favorable for most of western Europe with the region between the storm to the north and strong Azores high pressure, resulting in elevated onshore winds for most locales.

 This storm has proved to be rather impressive, rapidly intensifying near Greenland on Saturday before bottoming out on Sunday at 945mb and aided by adjacent 1042mb high pressure. The resulting pressure gradient developed hurricane force winds on Sunday which the storm maintained through Monday as it tracked east towards Scotland, producing seas in excess of 50ft.
The 
M4 buoy in the north of Ireland recorded a single wave height of 72ft and a significant wave height over 50ft on Monday afternoon! As the swell peaks today for points further south, we have seen the Gascogne buoy in Biscay Bay over 25ft through most of the day. A Portugese nearshore buoy has measured individual waves over 30ft and maximum periods of 20secs. If only the winds were more cooperative today...
The next storm in line will begin to take shape south of Greenland today and is forecast to deepen on Wednesday, developing hurricane force winds. This storm looks to bottom out at 940mb on Thursday near Iceland, maintaining hurricane force winds as a 1033mb high moves out of the western Atlantic to the south of the storm. Large to XL size swell from this system is expected to reach the British Isles second half of the week and fill in for portions of the Iberian Peninsula end of week and into the weekend.
While this swell is not expected to be as large as the swell early week, conditions have the potential to be much more favorable for some this go round. The aforementioned high pressure will migrate east through the week, briefly extending over the Isles and reaching Biscay Bay end of week. Some regions could see periods of manageable to favorable conditions during this period that will be worth monitoring.
More storm activity is expected in the northern Atlantic over the weekend, keeping solid to large surf going well into next week. Be sure to check your local 
Regional Forecast for more details, with many countries updated 3X weekly by our human forecasters. And don't forget about the many HD cams available in Portugal, Spain, and France porviding a variety of breaks to view from the comfort of your desk or couch.
Check the video below to see the first storm from early week develop over the North Atlantic. Notice the large high pressure in control of the central Atlantic break down as the storm deepens near Greenland and moves east, bringing a front and increased onshore winds through the region.
Video courtesy of NOAA's Ocean Prediction Center:

Fonte

Intense storm in the northern Atlantic moves into the Norwegian Sea today and weakens as XL sized NW swell from the storm impacts mainland Europe. The British Isles will start to see some relief from the pummeling the storm has delivered as near-gale onshore winds relax through the day. Unfortunately, conditions are not looking favorable for most of western Europe with the region between the storm to the north and strong Azores high pressure, resulting in elevated onshore winds for most locales.


 This storm has proved to be rather impressive, rapidly intensifying near Greenland on Saturday before bottoming out on Sunday at 945mb and aided by adjacent 1042mb high pressure. The resulting pressure gradient developed hurricane force winds on Sunday which the storm maintained through Monday as it tracked east towards Scotland, producing seas in excess of 50ft.
The 
M4 buoy in the north of Ireland recorded a single wave height of 72ft and a significant wave height over 50ft on Monday afternoon! As the swell peaks today for points further south, we have seen the Gascogne buoy in Biscay Bay over 25ft through most of the day. A Portugese nearshore buoy has measured individual waves over 30ft and maximum periods of 20secs. If only the winds were more cooperative today...
The next storm in line will begin to take shape south of Greenland today and is forecast to deepen on Wednesday, developing hurricane force winds. This storm looks to bottom out at 940mb on Thursday near Iceland, maintaining hurricane force winds as a 1033mb high moves out of the western Atlantic to the south of the storm. Large to XL size swell from this system is expected to reach the British Isles second half of the week and fill in for portions of the Iberian Peninsula end of week and into the weekend.
While this swell is not expected to be as large as the swell early week, conditions have the potential to be much more favorable for some this go round. The aforementioned high pressure will migrate east through the week, briefly extending over the Isles and reaching Biscay Bay end of week. Some regions could see periods of manageable to favorable conditions during this period that will be worth monitoring.
More storm activity is expected in the northern Atlantic over the weekend, keeping solid to large surf going well into next week. Be sure to check your local 
Regional Forecast for more details, with many countries updated 3X weekly by our human forecasters. And don't forget about the many HD cams available in Portugal, Spain, and France porviding a variety of breaks to view from the comfort of your desk or couch.
Check the video below to see the first storm from early week develop over the North Atlantic. Notice the large high pressure in control of the central Atlantic break down as the storm deepens near Greenland and moves east, bringing a front and increased onshore winds through the region.
Video courtesy of NOAA's Ocean Prediction Center:

Fonte

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